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Venice

Venice

Author: Thomas F. Madden
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101601132
Pages: 464
Year: 2012-10-25
An extraordinary chronicle of Venice, its people, and its grandeur Thomas Madden’s majestic, sprawling history of Venice is the first full portrait of the city in English in almost thirty years. Using long-buried archival material and a wealth of newly translated documents, Madden weaves a spellbinding story of a place and its people, tracing an arc from the city’s humble origins as a lagoon refuge to its apex as a vast maritime empire and Renaissance epicenter to its rebirth as a modern tourist hub. Madden explores all aspects of Venice’s breathtaking achievements: the construction of its unparalleled navy, its role as an economic powerhouse and birthplace of capitalism, its popularization of opera, the stunning architecture of its watery environs, and more. He sets these in the context of the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire, the endless waves of Crusades to the Holy Land, and the awesome power of Turkish sultans. And perhaps most critically, Madden corrects the stereotype of Shakespeare’s money-lending Shylock that has distorted the Venetian character, uncovering instead a much more complex and fascinating story, peopled by men and women whose ingenuity and deep faith profoundly altered the course of civilization.
Venice

Venice

Author: Thomas F. Madden
Publisher: Penguin Paperbacks
ISBN: 0147509807
Pages: 464
Year: 2013-10-29
An all-encompassing history of Venice draws on rare archival material and newly translated documents to chronicle the city's rise from a humble lagoon refuge, to its apex as a maritime empire and Renaissance epicenter, to its rebirth as a modern tourist hub. 20,000 first printing.
Venice

Venice

Author: Thomas F. Madden
Publisher: Viking Adult
ISBN: 0670025429
Pages: 446
Year: 2012
Draws on rare archival material and newly translated documents to chronicle the city's rise from a humble lagoon refuge to its apex as a maritime empire and Renaissance epicenter to its rebirth as a modern tourist hub.
Venice, A Maritime Republic

Venice, A Maritime Republic

Author: Frederic Chapin Lane
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 080181460X
Pages: 505
Year: 1973-11-01
"Frederic Lane has achieved what is the often unfulfilled dream of every historian who has devoted his entire work to the exploration of partial aspects of a single broad subject: he has given us a comprehensive, thoughtful, readable, beautifully illustrated general history of Venice from the origins to the beginning of decline." -- Speculum
City of Fortune

City of Fortune

Author: Roger Crowley
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0679644261
Pages: 464
Year: 2012-01-24
“The rise and fall of Venice’s empire is an irresistible story and [Roger] Crowley, with his rousing descriptive gifts and scholarly attention to detail, is its perfect chronicler.”—The Financial Times The New York Times bestselling author of Empires of the Sea charts Venice’s astounding five-hundred-year voyage to the pinnacle of power in an epic story that stands unrivaled for drama, intrigue, and sheer opulent majesty. City of Fortune traces the full arc of the Venetian imperial saga, from the ill-fated Fourth Crusade, which culminates in the sacking of Constantinople in 1204, to the Ottoman-Venetian War of 1499–1503, which sees the Ottoman Turks supplant the Venetians as the preeminent naval power in the Mediterranean. In between are three centuries of Venetian maritime dominance, during which a tiny city of “lagoon dwellers” grow into the richest place on earth. Drawing on firsthand accounts of pitched sea battles, skillful negotiations, and diplomatic maneuvers, Crowley paints a vivid picture of this avaricious, enterprising people and the bountiful lands that came under their dominion. From the opening of the spice routes to the clash between Christianity and Islam, Venice played a leading role in the defining conflicts of its time—the reverberations of which are still being felt today. “[Crowley] writes with a racy briskness that lifts sea battles and sieges off the page.”—The New York Times “Crowley chronicles the peak of Venice’s past glory with Wordsworthian sympathy, supplemented by impressive learning and infectious enthusiasm.”—The Wall Street Journal
Venice: Lion City

Venice: Lion City

Author: Garry Wills
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439122121
Pages: 416
Year: 2013-05-28
Garry Wills's Venice: Lion City is a tour de force -- a rich, colorful, and provocative history of the world's most fascinating city in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, when it was at the peak of its glory. This was not the city of decadence, carnival, and nostalgia familiar to us from later centuries. It was a ruthless imperial city, with a shrewd commercial base, like ancient Athens, which it resembled in its combination of art and sea empire. Venice: Lion City presents a new way of relating the history of the city through its art and, in turn, illuminates the art through the city's history. It is illustrated with more than 130 works of art, 30 in full color. Garry Wills gives us a unique view of Venice's rulers, merchants, clerics, laborers, its Jews, and its women as they created a city that is the greatest art museum in the world, a city whose allure remains undiminished after centuries. Like Simon Schama's The Embarrassment of Riches, on the Dutch culture in the Golden Age, Venice: Lion City will take its place as a classic work of history and criticism.
Italian Venice

Italian Venice

Author: R. J. B. Bosworth
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300193874
Pages: 352
Year: 2014-09-30
In this elegant book Richard Bosworth explores Venice—not the glorious Venice of the Venetian Republic, but from the fall of the Republic in 1797 and the Risorgimento up through the present day. Bosworth looks at the glamour and squalor of the belle époque and the dark underbelly of modernization, the two world wars, and the far-reaching oppressions of the fascist regime, through to the “Disneylandification” of Venice and the tourist boom, the worldwide attention of the biennale and film festival, and current threats of subsidence and flooding posed by global warming. He draws out major themes—the increasingly anachronistic but deeply embedded Catholic Church, the two faces of modernization, consumerism versus culture. Bosworth interrogates not just Venice’s history but its meanings, and how the city’s past has been co-opted to suit present and sometimes ulterior aims. Venice, he shows, is a city where its histories as well as its waters ripple on the surface.
Istanbul

Istanbul

Author: Thomas F. Madden
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698140583
Pages: 400
Year: 2016-11-22
For more than two millennia Istanbul has stood at the crossroads of the world, perched at the very tip of Europe, gazing across at the shores of Asia. The history of this city—known as Byzantium, then Constantinople, now Istanbul—is at once glorious, outsized, and astounding. Founded by the Greeks, its location blessed it as a center for trade but also made it a target of every empire in history, from Alexander the Great and his Macedonian Empire, to the Romans and later the Ottomans. At its most spectacular, Istanbul was re-founded by Emperor Constantine I as New Rome, the capital of the eastern Roman Empire. He dramatically expanded the city, filling it with artistic treasures, and adorning the streets with opulent palaces. Constantine built new walls around it all—walls that were truly impregnable and preserved power, wealth, and withstood any aggressor—walls that still stand for tourists to visit. From its ancient past to the present, we meet the city through its ordinary citizens—the Jews, Muslims, Italians, Greeks, and Russians who used the famous baths and walked the bazaars, and the rulers who built it up and then destroyed it, including Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the man who christened the city "Istanbul" in 1930. Thomas Madden's entertaining narrative brings to life the city we see today, including the rich splendor of the churches and monasteries that spread throughout the city. Istanbul draws on a lifetime of study and the latest scholarship, transporting readers to a city of unparalleled importance and majesty that holds the key to understanding modern civilization. In the words of Napoleon Bonaparte, "If the Earth were a single state, Istanbul would be its capital."
A Brief History of Venice

A Brief History of Venice

Author: Elizabeth Horodowich
Publisher: Robinson
ISBN: 1472107748
Pages: 160
Year: 2013-02-07
In this colourful new history of Venice, Elizabeth Horodowich, one of the leading experts on Venice, tells the story of the place from its ancient origins, and its early days as a multicultural trading city where Christians, Jews and Muslims lived together at the crossroads between East and West. She explores the often overlooked role of Venice, alongside Florence and Rome, as one of the principal Renaissance capitals. Now, as the resident population falls and the number of tourists grows, as brash new advertisements disfigure the ancient buildings, she looks at the threat from the rising water level and the future of one of the great wonders of the world.
A History of Venice

A History of Venice

Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141936789
Pages: 704
Year: 2003-07-03
John Julius Norwich's dazzling history of Venice from its origins to its eighteenth century fall. 'Lord Norwich has loved and understood Venice as well as any other Englishman has ever done. He has put readers of his generation more in his debt than any other English writer' Peter Levi, The Sunday Times.
Venice

Venice

Author: Joanne M. Ferraro
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521883598
Pages: 268
Year: 2012-07-30
Following Venice's unique history from its foundation, this book analyzes the city's social, cultural, religious, and environmental history, as well as its politics and economy. Joanne M. Ferraro illuminates how Venice's position at the crossroads of Asian, European, and North African exchange networks made it a vibrant and ethnically diverse Mediterranean cultural center.
Empires of Trust

Empires of Trust

Author: Thomas F. Madden
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440631395
Pages: 352
Year: 2008-07-17
An acclaimed historian offers an optimistic view of the future of the United States in the light of Roman history Maybe the end of the American ascendancy is not upon us. Maybe the U.S. will continue to dominate the world for centuries. Now award-winning historian Thomas Madden delivers an optimistic view of our nation's future. Madden shows that the power of the ancient Roman republic and the U.S. was built on trust between allies, not the conquest of enemies. The far-reaching implications of this fact are essential reading for anyone who cares about the challenges we face now and in the years ahead. Packed with stories from Roman history that offer amazingly obvious and explicitly stated parallels to our recent history, Empires of Trust is a narrative pleasure and a hopeful inspiration.
Bound in Venice

Bound in Venice

Author: Alessandro Marzo Magno
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 160945152X
Pages: 229
Year: 2013-10-01
A highly readable but erudite book in the style of Alberto Angela's A Day in the Life of Ancient Rome and Stephen Greenblatt's The Swerve, this is the incredible story of Venice at a time when it was the mercantile and cultural capital of the world. There, in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, the first real publishing houses open for business leading to an explosion of the written word and an unprecedented diffusion of human knowledge. In Venice, and subsequently in much of the civilized world, bound printed editions of the Talmud, the Koran, the works or Erasmus of Rotterdam, and classics of Greek and Latin poetry and theater will circulate for the first time, bringing about a true revolution and the birth of the modern. Among the innovators who are driving these new cultural enterprises, one remarkable visionary, Aldus Manutius, credited with inventing the figure of the modern publisher, stands head and shoulders above the rest. This is his story, and the story of the incredible city that allowed such an innovator to thrive.
Venice

Venice

Author: Richard John Goy
Publisher:
ISBN: 0300148828
Pages: 524
Year: 2010
Each year, millions of visitors travel to Venice to admire the architectural marvels of this famed city. In this brief yet comprehensive volume, distinguished architect and critic Richard Goy offers a convenient and accessible guide to the city’s piazzas, palazzos, basilicas, and other architectural points of interest, as well as pertinent historical details regarding Venice’s unique urban environment. Clearly laid out and fully illustrated in color, this handbook is designed around a series of expertly planned walking tours that encompass not only the city’s most admired architectural sites but also its lesser-known gems. Specially made maps accompany each walking tour and provide additional references and insights alongside introductory chapters on the city’s architectural history, urban design, and building materials and techniques. Featuring a complete bibliography, glossary of key terms, and other useful reference materials, Goy’s guide will appeal both to travelers who desire greater architectural context and analysis than a traditional guide may provide and to return visitors looking to rediscover Venice’s most enchanting sites.
The Venetians

The Venetians

Author: Paul Strathern
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1480448389
Pages: 368
Year: 2013-12-03
A “useful and informative introduction” to the independent Republic of Venice—the first great economic and cultural power of the modern Western world (Booklist). After winning the struggle for ascendency in the late 13th century, the Republic of Venice enjoyed centuries of unprecedented glory and built a trading empire which at its apogee reached as far afield as China, Syria, and West Africa. This golden period only drew to an end with the Republic’s eventual surrender to Napoleon. The Venetians illuminates the character of the Republic during these illustrious years by shining a light on some of the most celebrated personalities of European history—Petrarch, Marco Polo, Galileo, Titian, Vivaldi, Casanova. Frequently, though, these emblems of the city found themselves at odds with the Venetian authorities, who prized stability above all else, and were notoriously suspicious of any “cult of personality.” Was this very tension perhaps the engine for the Republic’s unprecedented rise? Rich with biographies of some of the most exalted characters who have ever lived, The Venetians is a refreshing and authoritative new look at the history of the most evocative of city-states.