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Beyond the Sea of Ice

Beyond the Sea of Ice

Author: William Sarabande
Publisher: Domain
ISBN: 0553268899
Pages: 373
Year: 1987
When humans first walked the world and learn to live in an exotic new world of mystery and danger.
The First Americans

The First Americans

Author: James Adovasio, Jake Page
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 0307565718
Pages: 352
Year: 2009-01-16
J. M. Adovasio has spent the last thirty years at the center of one of our most fiery scientific debates: Who were the first humans in the Americas, and how and when did they get there? At its heart, The First Americans is the story of the revolution in thinking that Adovasio and his fellow archaeologists have brought about, and the firestorm it has ignited. As he writes, “The work of lifetimes has been put at risk, reputations have been damaged, an astounding amount of silliness and even profound stupidity has been taken as serious thought, and always lurking in the background of all the argumentation and gnashing of tenets has been the question of whether the field of archaeology can ever be pursued as a science.” From the Trade Paperback edition.
Fossil Legends of the First Americans

Fossil Legends of the First Americans

Author: Adrienne Mayor
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400849314
Pages: 488
Year: 2013-10-24
The burnt-red badlands of Montana's Hell Creek are a vast graveyard of the Cretaceous dinosaurs that lived 68 million years ago. Those hills were, much later, also home to the Sioux, the Crows, and the Blackfeet, the first people to encounter the dinosaur fossils exposed by the elements. What did Native Americans make of these stone skeletons, and how did they explain the teeth and claws of gargantuan animals no one had seen alive? Did they speculate about their deaths? Did they collect fossils? Beginning in the East, with its Ice Age monsters, and ending in the West, where dinosaurs lived and died, this richly illustrated and elegantly written book examines the discoveries of enormous bones and uses of fossils for medicine, hunting magic, and spells. Well before Columbus, Native Americans observed the mysterious petrified remains of extinct creatures and sought to understand their transformation to stone. In perceptive creation stories, they visualized the remains of extinct mammoths, dinosaurs, pterosaurs, and marine creatures as Monster Bears, Giant Lizards, Thunder Birds, and Water Monsters. Their insights, some so sophisticated that they anticipate modern scientific theories, were passed down in oral histories over many centuries. Drawing on historical sources, archaeology, traditional accounts, and extensive personal interviews, Adrienne Mayor takes us from Aztec and Inca fossil tales to the traditions of the Iroquois, Navajos, Apaches, Cheyennes, and Pawnees. Fossil Legends of the First Americans represents a major step forward in our understanding of how humans made sense of fossils before evolutionary theory developed.
First Americans

First Americans

Author: Kenneth W. Townsend, Mark A. Nicholas
Publisher: Prentice Hall
ISBN: 0132069482
Pages: 648
Year: 2012-01
Tells the complete story of Native American history, including the native perspective. First Americans provides a history of Native Americans, from their earliest appearance in North America to the present, that covers the complexity and diversity of their past. The text demonstrates Native Americans' participation in determining their own future and helps students place Native American history in context with national and international developments. Present throughout the text is the "native voice," giving American Indians' perspectives on historical developments. The text also enforces the reality that native people retain a presence in the U.S. today as a growing population with a rich diversity of roles, ideas, and contributions. A better teaching and learning experience This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience--for you and your students. Here's how: Personalize Learning - MySearchLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals. Improve Critical Thinking - To enhance student comprehension, each chapter includes features such as Chronologies, Key Questions, Review Questions, and Recommended Readings. Engage Students - Special features are included to highlight the native voice and support the themes presented. Support Instructors - MySearchLab, Instructor's Resource Center, Instructor's Manual, Test Bank, MyTest, and PowerPoint presentations are available to be packaged with this text. For volume one of this text, search ISBN-10: 0205055761 For volume two of this text, search ISBN-10: 0205055877 Note: MySearchLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MySearchLab, please visit: www.mysearchlab.com or you can purchase a ValuePack of the text + MySearchLab (at no additional cost): ValuePack ISBN-10: 0205721818 / ValuePack ISBN-13: 9780205721818.
The First Americans

The First Americans

Author: Library of Congress, William H. Goetzmann
Publisher: Starwood Pub
ISBN:
Pages: 144
Year: 1991
A collection of photographs of Native Americans from the Library of Congress' collection
The First Americans

The First Americans

Author: John David Cross
Publisher: New Word City
ISBN: 1936529432
Pages: 195
Year: 2016-12-17
It was about 13,000 years ago that the First Americans, people who came from Asia, worked their way past the melting glaciers of the last Ice Age and began spreading across North, Central, and South America - lands previously unscarred by humans and teeming with mammoths, giant bison, saber-toothed tigers, and beavers the size of a cow. But it's only recently that scientists have pieced together the elusive, compelling saga of that epic migration. And the more we learn about them, the more we must marvel at the courage, adaptability, enterprise, and enduring resilience of the First Americans. Most of us know little about the early Americans and the wonders they achieved. Some of them learned to hunt forty-ton whales from dugout canoes; others built a vast system of canals that irrigated crops on tens of thousands of acres. Fully a thousand years before the pyramids at Giza went up, people on the Mississippi River were constructing even larger pyramidal earthworks, and later, a thousand miles to the north, others built a city that would remain the largest in North America until after the Revolutionary War. In the cradle of civilization that evolved in Central America, the Olmecs, Mayans, and Aztecs built complex cultures and dazzling cities whose monumental structures and works of art still have the power to awe and inspire. This book describes the peopling of North and Central America and examine their amazing societies - the farmers and cliff-dwellers of the Southwest United States, the mound-builders of the Midwest, the Northwest Coast whale-hunters with their potlatches and totem poles, and the mighty, gods-driven cultures of Mesoamerica. It is a saga as breathtaking as it is surprising.
The First Americans

The First Americans

Author: Joy Hakim
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195153200
Pages: 184
Year: 2003
Discusses the United States' prehistory, including Native American life and early explorers such as Christopher Columbus and Ponce de Leon.
Lacrosse Legends of the First Americans

Lacrosse Legends of the First Americans

Author: Thomas Vennum
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 0801886295
Pages: 167
Year: 2007-07-17
Thomas Vennum brings together thirteen Native American legends from five lacrosse playing tribes -- the Cherokee, Ho-Chunk (Winnebago), Seneca, Ojibwe, and Menominee -- to provide a glimpse into Native American life and the role "the Creator's Game" played in tribal culture.
The First Americans

The First Americans

Author: Joseph F. Powell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521530350
Pages: 268
Year: 2005-10-06
Who were the first Americans? What is their relationship to living native peoples in the Americas? What do their remains tell us of the current concepts of racial variation, and short-term evolutionary change and adaptation. The recent discoveries in the Americas of the 9000-12000 year old skeletons such as 'Kennewick Man' in Washington State, 'Luzia' in Brazil and 'Prince of Wales Island Man' in Alaska have begun to challenge our understanding of who first entered the Americas at the end of the last Ice Age. New archaeological and geological research is beginning to change the hypothesis of land bridge crossings and the extinction of ancient animals. The First Americans explores these questions by using racial classifications and microevolutionary techniques to better understand who colonized the Americas and how. It will be required reading for all those interested in anthropology, and the history and archaeology of the earliest Americans.
Bones

Bones

Author: Elaine Dewar
Publisher: Vintage Canada
ISBN: 0307375552
Pages: 640
Year: 2011-03-04
Scientists not so long ago unanimously believed that people first walked to the New World from northeast Asia across the Bering land bridge at the end of the Ice Age 11,000 years ago. But in the last ten years, new tools applied to old bones have yielded evidence that tells an entirely different story. In Bones, Elaine Dewar records the ferocious struggle in the scientific world to reshape our views of prehistory. She traveled from the Mackenzie River valley in northern Canada to the arid plains of the Brazilian state of Piaui, from the skull-and-bones-lines offices of the Smithsonian Institution to the basement lab of an archaeologist in Washington State who wondered if the FBI was going to come for him. She met scientists at war with each other and sought to see for herself the oldest human remains on these continents. Along the way, she found that the old answer to the question of who were the First Americans was steeped in the bitter tea of racism. Bones explores the ambiguous terrain left behind when a scientific paradigm is swept away. It tells the stories of the archaeologists, Native American activists, DNA experts and physical anthropologists scrambling for control of ancient bones of Kennewick Man, Spirit Cave, and the oldest one of all, a woman named Luzia. At stake are professional reputations, lucrative grants, fame, vindication, even the reburial of wandering spirits. The weapons? Lawsuits, threats, violence. The battlefield stretches from Chile to Alaska. Dewar tells the stories that never find their way into scientific papers — stories of mysterious deaths, of the bones of evil shamen and the shadows falling on the lives of scientists who pulled them from the ground. And she asks the new questions arising out of the science of bones and the stories of first peoples: "What if Native Americans are right in their belief that they have always been in the Americas and did not migrate to the New World at the end of the Ice Age? What if the New World's human story is as long and complicated as that of the Old? What if the New World and the Old World have always been one?" From the Hardcover edition.
Ancient Encounters

Ancient Encounters

Author: James C. Chatters
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684859378
Pages: 304
Year: 2002-08-13
Examines evidence about early visitors to North America predating the Native Americans, and describes the 1996 discovery of a skeleton near Kennewick, Washington, whose physical characteristics where unlike those of American Indians.
Forbidden Land

Forbidden Land

Author: William Sarabande
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0553282069
Pages: 448
Year: 1989
When his tribe turns against him, the defiant hunter Torka and his wife Lonit must flee with their children to a savage and strange land to build a new life
Atlas of a Lost World

Atlas of a Lost World

Author: Craig Childs
Publisher: Pantheon
ISBN: 0307908666
Pages: 288
Year: 2018-05-01
From the author of Apocalyptic Planet comes a vivid travelogue through prehistory, that traces the arrival of the first people in North America at least twenty thousand years ago and the artifacts that tell of their lives and fates. In Atlas of a Lost World, Craig Childs upends our notions of where these people came from and who they were. How they got here, persevered, and ultimately thrived is a story that resonates from the Pleistocene to our modern era. The lower sea levels of the Ice Age exposed a vast land bridge between Asia and North America, but the land bridge was not the only way across. Different people arrived from different directions, and not all at the same time. The first explorers of the New World were few, their encampments fleeting. The continent they reached had no people but was inhabited by megafauna—mastodons, giant bears, mammoths, saber-toothed cats, five-hundred-pound panthers, enormous bison, and sloths that stood one story tall. The first people were hunters—Paleolithic spear points are still encrusted with the proteins of their prey—but they were wildly outnumbered and many would themselves have been prey to the much larger animals. Atlas of a Lost World chronicles the last millennia of the Ice Age, the violent oscillations and retreat of glaciers, the clues and traces that document the first encounters of early humans, and the animals whose presence governed the humans’ chances for survival. A blend of science and personal narrative reveals how much has changed since the time of mammoth hunters, and how little. Across unexplored landscapes yet to be peopled, readers will see the Ice Age, and their own age, in a whole new light.
The Very First Americans

The Very First Americans

Author: Cara Ashrose
Publisher: Paw Prints
ISBN: 1442069430
Pages:
Year: 2009-08-18
Briefly describes some of the hundreds of Indian tribes that lived across America before the arrival of Europeans
Jefferson and the Indians

Jefferson and the Indians

Author: Anthony F C Wallace
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674044800
Pages: 416
Year: 2009-06-01
In Thomas Jefferson's time, white Americans were bedeviled by a moral dilemma unyielding to reason and sentiment: what to do about the presence of black slaves and free Indians. That Jefferson himself was caught between his own soaring rhetoric and private behavior toward blacks has long been known. But the tortured duality of his attitude toward Indians is only now being unearthed. In this landmark history, Anthony Wallace takes us on a tour of discovery to unexplored regions of Jefferson's mind. There, the bookish Enlightenment scholar--collector of Indian vocabularies, excavator of ancient burial mounds, chronicler of the eloquence of America's native peoples, and mourner of their tragic fate--sits uncomfortably close to Jefferson the imperialist and architect of Indian removal. Impelled by the necessity of expanding his agrarian republic, he became adept at putting a philosophical gloss on his policy of encroachment, threats of war, and forced land cessions--a policy that led, eventually, to cultural genocide. In this compelling narrative, we see how Jefferson's close relationships with frontier fighters and Indian agents, land speculators and intrepid explorers, European travelers, missionary scholars, and the chiefs of many Indian nations all complicated his views of the rights and claims of the first Americans. Lavishly illustrated with scenes and portraits from the period, "Jefferson and the Indians" adds a troubled dimension to one of the most enigmatic figures of American history, and to one of its most shameful legacies.