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Across Atlantic Ice

Across Atlantic Ice

Author: Dennis J. Stanford, Bruce A. Bradley
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520275780
Pages: 319
Year: 2013-06-03
Argues that the Solutrean culture of coastal Spain and the European Atlantic Shelf was the ancestral industry to the North American Clovis industry.
Across Atlantic Ice

Across Atlantic Ice

Author: Dennis J. Stanford, Bruce A. Bradley
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520949676
Pages: 336
Year: 2012-02-28
Who were the first humans to inhabit North America? According to the now familiar story, mammal hunters entered the continent some 12,000 years ago via a land bridge that spanned the Bering Sea. Distinctive stone tools belonging to the Clovis culture established the presence of these early New World people. But are the Clovis tools Asian in origin? Drawing from original archaeological analysis, paleoclimatic research, and genetic studies, noted archaeologists Dennis J. Stanford and Bruce A. Bradley challenge the old narrative and, in the process, counter traditional—and often subjective—approaches to archaeological testing for historical relatedness. The authors apply rigorous scholarship to a hypothesis that places the technological antecedents of Clovis in Europe and posits that the first Americans crossed the Atlantic by boat and arrived earlier than previously thought. Supplying archaeological and oceanographic evidence to support this assertion, the book dismantles the old paradigm while persuasively linking Clovis technology with the culture of the Solutrean people who occupied France and Spain more than 20,000 years ago.
Across Atlantic Ice

Across Atlantic Ice

Author: Dennis J. Stanford, Bruce A. Bradley
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520227832
Pages: 319
Year: 2012
Argues that the Solutrean culture of coastal Spain and the European Atlantic Shelf was the ancestral industry to the North American Clovis industry.
First Peoples in a New World

First Peoples in a New World

Author: David J. Meltzer
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520943155
Pages: 464
Year: 2009-05-27
More than 12,000 years ago, in one of the greatest triumphs of prehistory, humans colonized North America, a continent that was then truly a new world. Just when and how they did so has been one of the most perplexing and controversial questions in archaeology. This dazzling, cutting-edge synthesis, written for a wide audience by an archaeologist who has long been at the center of these debates, tells the scientific story of the first Americans: where they came from, when they arrived, and how they met the challenges of moving across the vast, unknown landscapes of Ice Age North America. David J. Meltzer pulls together the latest ideas from archaeology, geology, linguistics, skeletal biology, genetics, and other fields to trace the breakthroughs that have revolutionized our understanding in recent years. Among many other topics, he explores disputes over the hemisphere's oldest and most controversial sites and considers how the first Americans coped with changing global climates. He also confronts some radical claims: that the Americas were colonized from Europe or that a crashing comet obliterated the Pleistocene megafauna. Full of entertaining descriptions of on-site encounters, personalities, and controversies, this is a compelling behind-the-scenes account of how science is illuminating our past.
Bipoints Before Clovis

Bipoints Before Clovis

Author: Wm Jack Hranicky
Publisher: Universal-Publishers
ISBN: 161233136X
Pages: 394
Year: 2012
This archaeological publication covers the development, definition, classification, and world-wide deployment of the lithic bipoint and includes numerous photographs, drawings, and maps. Lithic bipoint technology originated 75,000 years ago, and it continued to the discovery of metal for tools. It was brought into the U.S. on both coasts; the Pacific Coast introduction was around 17,000 years ago and the Atlantic Coast was 23,000 years ago. This book presents and discusses bipoints from nearly every U.S. state. Bipoint function, usage, and resharpening are also presented. The book is indexed and has extensive references.
Bones, Boats & Bison

Bones, Boats & Bison

Author: E. James Dixon
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826321380
Pages: 322
Year: 1999
This revolutionary archeological synthesis argues an alternative model of the earliest human population of North America. E. James Dixon dispels the stereotype of big-game hunters following mammoths across the Bering Land Bridge and paints a vivid picture of marine mammal hunters, fishers, and general foragers colonizing the New World. Applying contemporary scientific methods and drawing on new archeological discoveries, he advances evidence indicating that humans first reached the Americas using water craft along the deglaciated Northwest Coast about 13,500 years ago, some 2,000 years before the first Clovis hunters. Dixon's rigorous evaluation of the oldest North American archeological sites and human remains offers well-reasoned hypotheses about the physical characteristics, lives, and relationships of the First Americans. His crisply written analysis of scientific exploration is essential reading for scholars, students, and general readers.
Clovis Lithic Technology

Clovis Lithic Technology

Author: Michael R. Waters, Charlotte D. Pevny, David L. Carlson, Thomas A. Jennings
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 160344467X
Pages: 224
Year: 2011-10-01
Some 13,000 years ago, humans were drawn repeatedly to a small valley in what is now Central Texas, near the banks of Buttermilk Creek. These early hunter-gatherers camped, collected stone, and shaped it into a variety of tools they needed to hunt game, process food, and subsist in the Texas wilderness. Their toolkit included bifaces, blades, and deadly spear points. Where they worked, they left thousands of pieces of debris, which have allowed archaeologists to reconstruct their methods of tool production. Along with the faunal material that was also discarded in their prehistoric campsite, these stone, or lithic, artifacts afford a glimpse of human life at the end of the last ice age during an era referred to as Clovis. The area where these people roamed and camped, called the Gault site, is one of the most important Clovis sites in North America. A decade ago a team from Texas A&M University excavated a single area of the site—formally named Excavation Area 8, but informally dubbed the Lindsey Pit—which features the densest concentration of Clovis artifacts and the clearest stratigraphy at the Gault site. Some 67,000 lithic artifacts were recovered during fieldwork, along with 5,700 pieces of faunal material. In a thorough synthesis of the evidence from this prehistoric “workshop,” Michael R. Waters and his coauthors provide the technical data needed to interpret and compare this site with other sites from the same period, illuminating the story of Clovis people in the Buttermilk Creek Valley.
Prehistoric Projectile Points Found Along the Atlantic Coastal Plain

Prehistoric Projectile Points Found Along the Atlantic Coastal Plain

Author: Wm Jack Hranicky
Publisher: Universal-Publishers
ISBN: 1612330223
Pages: 282
Year: 2011
This publication was written to provide a source for archaeological projectile point typology for a region of the U.S. that over the years has been traditionally divided into: Northeast culture area Middle Atlantic culture area Southeastern culture area These divisions are based primarily on lithic technology and settlement patterns. While this focus tends to serve archaeological investigations, most of the prehistoric Indian habitation/occupation requires greater definition and appraisal from other sources within the archaeological community. Even among artifact collectors, there is a tendency to parcel these areas into the classic culture area concepts. This publication makes no attempts to refocus archaeology, but to show the vast overlaps of numerous point technologies. This is especially true over time; so that, for lithic point technology in general, there is a Panindian focus that can be applied to almost every tool type along the Atlantic Coast. This publication provides most of the published types from along the Atlantic seaboard. Each type has a basic description and the illustration is an ideal point for that type. A set of point references is provided; these make excellent (and needed) sources for the study of projectile point studies.
Clovis Revisited

Clovis Revisited

Author: Anthony T. Boldurian, John L. Cotter
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 1934536725
Pages: 168
Year: 2013-11-01
Explore the early days of Paleoindian archaeology in this engaging retrospective of Edgar B. Howard's Southwest Early Man Project, 1929-1937, cosponsored by the University Museum and the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. This book contains a detailed analysis of the world-famous Clovis artifacts, discovered among the bones of mammoths and extinct bison in the Dust Bowl of eastern New Mexico. Blending traditional and current ideas, the authors offer an extended reference to the lifeways of early humans in the Americas, accented by a series of unique insights on their origins and adaptations. Well appointed with photos, line illustrations, and schematics, Clovis Revisited is essential reading for professionals, students, and avocational enthusiasts.
The First Americans

The First Americans

Author: James Adovasio, Jake Page
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 0307565718
Pages: 352
Year: 2009-01-16
J. M. Adovasio has spent the last thirty years at the center of one of our most fiery scientific debates: Who were the first humans in the Americas, and how and when did they get there? At its heart, The First Americans is the story of the revolution in thinking that Adovasio and his fellow archaeologists have brought about, and the firestorm it has ignited. As he writes, “The work of lifetimes has been put at risk, reputations have been damaged, an astounding amount of silliness and even profound stupidity has been taken as serious thought, and always lurking in the background of all the argumentation and gnashing of tenets has been the question of whether the field of archaeology can ever be pursued as a science.” From the Trade Paperback edition.
The Hogeye Clovis Cache

The Hogeye Clovis Cache

Author: Michael R. Waters, Thomas A. Jennings
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623492327
Pages: 172
Year: 2015-04-15
Roughly thirteen thousand years ago, Clovis hunters cached more than fifty projectile points, preforms, and knives at the toe of a gentle slope near present-day Elgin, Bastrop County, in central Texas. Over the next millennia, deposition buried the cache several meters below the surface. The entombed artifacts lay undisturbed until 2003. A circuitous path brought thirteen of the original thirty-seven Clovis bifaces and points through many hands before reaching the attention of Michael Waters at Texas A&M University. At the site of the original cache, Waters and coauthor Thomas A. Jennings conducted excavations, studied the geology, and dated the geological layers to reconstruct how the cache was buried. This book provides a well-illustrated, thoroughly analyzed description and discussion of the Hogeye Clovis cache, the projectile points and other artifacts from later occupations, and the geological context of the site, which has yielded evidence of multiple Paleoindian, Archaic, and Late Prehistoric occupations. The cache of tools and weapons at Hogeye, when combined with other sites, allows us to envision a snapshot of life at the end of the last Ice Age.
Paleoamerican Odyssey

Paleoamerican Odyssey

Author: Kelly E. Graf, Caroline V. Ketron, Michael R. Waters
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623492335
Pages: 584
Year: 2014-08-20
As research continues on the earliest migration of modern humans into North and South America, the current state of knowledge about these first Americans is continually evolving. Especially with recent advances in human genomic studies, both of living populations and ancient skeletal remains, new light is being shed in the ongoing quest toward understanding the full complexity and timing of prehistoric migration patterns. Paleoamerican Odyssey collects thirty-one studies presented at the 2013 conference by the same name, hosted in Santa Fe, New Mexico, by the Center for the Study of the First Americans at Texas A&M University. Providing an up-to-date view of the current state of knowledge in paleoamerican studies, the research gathered in this volume, presented by leaders in the field, focuses especially on late Pleistocene Northeast Asia, Beringia, and North and South America, as well as dispersal routes, molecular genetics, and Clovis and pre-Clovis archaeology.
Kennewick Man

Kennewick Man

Author: Douglas W. Owsley, Richard L. Jantz
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623492343
Pages: 680
Year: 2014-09-10
Almost from the day of its accidental discovery along the banks of the Columbia River in Washington State in July 1996, the ancient skeleton of Kennewick Man has garnered significant attention from scientific and Native American communities as well as public media outlets. This volume represents a collaboration among physical and forensic anthropologists, archaeologists, geologists, and geochemists, among others, and presents the results of the scientific study of this remarkable find. Scholars address a range of topics, from basic aspects of osteological analysis to advanced ?research focused on Kennewick Man’s origins and his relationships to other populations. Interdisciplinary studies, comprehensive data collection and preservation, and applications of technology are all critical to telling Kennewick Man’s story. Kennewick Man: The Scientific Investigation of an Ancient American Skeleton is written for a discerning professional audience, yet the absorbing story of the remains, their discovery, their curation history, and the extensive amount of detail that skilled scientists have been able to glean from them will appeal to interested and informed general readers. These bones lay silent for nearly nine thousand years, but now, with the aid of dedicated researchers, they can speak about the life of one of the earliest human occupants of North America.
Clovis

Clovis

Author: Ashley M. Smallwood, Thomas A. Jennings
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623492289
Pages: 376
Year: 2014-12-01
New research and the discovery of multiple archaeological sites predating the established age of Clovis (13,000 years ago) provide evidence that the Americas were first colonized at least one thousand to two thousand years before Clovis. These revelations indicate to researchers that the peopling of the Americas was perhaps a more complex process than previously thought. The Clovis culture remains the benchmark for chronological, technological, and adaptive comparisons in research on peopling of the Americas. In Clovis: On the Edge of a New Understanding, volume editors Ashley Smallwood and Thomas Jennings bring together the work of many researchers actively studying the Clovis complex. The contributing authors presented earlier versions of these chapters at the Clovis: Current Perspectives on Chronology, Technology, and Adaptations symposium held at the 2011 Society for American Archaeology meetings in Sacramento, California. In seventeen chapters, the researchers provide their current perspectives of the Clovis archaeological record as they address the question: What is and what is not Clovis?
The Saltwater Frontier

The Saltwater Frontier

Author: Andrew Lipman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300207662
Pages: 360
Year: 2015-11-03
A fascinating new perspective on Native seafaring and colonial violence in the seventeenth-century American Northeast